OERS
Canadian Marine Mammal Rescue Network
 

Preparing for Disaster

Disaster Kit

Upon Warning of A Disaster

During Disaster/Evacuation

Returning after DIsaster

Supplements:

Reptiles

Birds

Other


 
Companion Animals - Detailed Information


Preparing for a Disaster

To Buy:

1. Solid Sided Pet Carrier

• This carrier is used for transportation

• Each pet must have their own solid sided carrier

o Pets that are stressed may turn aggressive towards other pets in your home and should be kept separated from each other.

• The solid sides will protect the animal from flying debris and will provide a layer of protection if your vehicle rolls

• Sizing: This carrier should only provide enough space for your animal to turn around and lie down

• Label each carrier with your pets’ information and your updated contact information

• Keep the crate assembled and ready for use at all times

• Get your pet accustomed to their carriers prior to a disaster situation

o Otherwise, this will add stress for the animal

o To get them accustomed to the carrier:

�� It can be used as sleeping quarters for the animal on a regular basis

�� Feed the animal a few meals inside the carrier several times a year

�� Line the crate with familiar blankets, toys and/or chew toys to keep the animal comfortable while in the crate

�� This will help the animal associate positive feelings with the crate and view it as a safe place to be

• Organize animals in a reasonable manner in your vehicle – ie: if there is not enough space in the car to have all your animals in crates, place the cats in crates and the let the dogs be free in the back of the car

2. Wire Pet Crate

• This crate is used for living in

• Each pet must have their own crate

o Pets that are stressed may turn aggressive towards other pets in your home and should be kept separated from each other.

• Collapsible wire crates are ideal for easy storage and transportation

• Assemble the wire crate regularly o ensure you know how it works

• A good quality crate is easy to set up (with a single pull) and can last a very long time

o Collapsible crates that requite pins are difficult to put up and take down

• Sizing:

o There should be enough room for the animal to live in the crate for extended periods of time

o For a dog: they should be able to stand, turn around, lie down and stretch
out comfortably. There should also be room for two non spill bowls

o For a cat: They should be large enough allow your cat to stand, lie down and stretch out comfortably. They should also be able to hold a small litter pan that the cat can stand in.

• Label each crate with your pets’ information and your updated contact information

• This crate should be placed in an easily accessible location such as in the car or garage

To Do:

1. Emergency Plan

• Involve the entire family in making an emergency plan that includes your animals. Give each family member the responsibility of one animal to avoid confusion

2. “Responsible Person”

• Pick someone to assume responsibility for your pet if you are not home during a disaster.

• Ask someone who:

Lives close to your home
Is usually home when you are not
Is willing to look after your pets
Is familiar with your pets

• They should have a key to your home

• This person should know where your animals are most likely to be when they enter the house and where their favourite hiding spots are

• They should know where your disaster kit is located and bring it with them

• You should arrange two predetermined meeting spots outside of your local area where you can obtain your pets and seek emergency shelter

3. Get your pet accustomed to their carrier

• It can be used as sleeping quarters for the animal on a regular basis

• Feed the animal a few meals inside the carrier several times a year

• Line the crate with familiar blankets, toys and/or chew toys to keep the animal comfortable while in the crate

• This will help the animal associate positive feelings with the crate and view it as a safe place to be

4. Get your animal accustomed to car trips

• Feed the animal while in a non moving car with the engine off

• Initially take short car trips with no destination except to come home

• Eventually, you will be able to take longer car rides without the animal becoming agitated

5. Ensure your pet has up to date vaccinations

• Some shelters or boarding facilities will not allow pets without current vaccinations

6. Pet ID

• Have proper identification attached to your animal

• Collar Tag, Neck band, Waterproof container attached to collar

o Information needs to be updated regularly

o These IDs should contain:

Pet’s name
Your name
Home telephone number
Cellular number
Emergency contact number of someone outside your immediate area

• Microchip

o This is the best way to identify your animal, but should be in addition to a collar tag

o Information should be updated regularly

• Tattoo

7. Disaster Kit


Disaster Kit

1. Food and water

• Enough food and water for at least 2 weeks

• Continue regular diet

• Place food in airtight, waterproof containers

• Keep water in a plastic container out of direct sunlight in a cool, dry place

o Average sized dogs need approximately 4 L of water per day

o Average sized cats need approximately 1 L of water per day

• Replace food and water every 2 months to avoid spoilage

• Feeding a canned or moist food diet during a disaster can reduce the amount of water needed by the animal

o If possible when feeding a canned food diet, buy single serving cans (as refrigeration may not be available) with pop top lids (so you do not need can openers)

6. Medications

• Enough for at least 2 weeks

• Place in an airtight, waterproof container

• Heartworm, flea and tick prevention if applicable to time of year and area

• Keep a record of dosage and administration schedule

• Keep storage requirements of some medications in mind

• Replace often as many medications, heartworm, flea and tick preventions expire

8 - 11. Collars, Leashes, Harnesses, Muzzles

• A pet may act differently under the stress of a disaster situation. You must have the appropriate equipment for you or others to properly handle your pet so that they do not hurt themselves or others.

• Pets may have the tendency to run away when in a strange place. This may be true even with the most reliable pets. Because of this, all animals should be secured with a leash or in a carrier at all times when being evacuated from a disaster situation.

• If a cat needs to be taken out of their carriers, they need to have secure harnesses and leashes attached to them at all times

• Extra leashes, collars and harnesses should be kept in your kit and/or in your car

12 - 13. Cat litter, litter box

• Enough litter to last at least 2 weeks

• Disposable litter pans or flat Tupperware may be useful as litter boxes

• Litter can also be used for traction under the wheels of your car or to soak up oil spills from your car

• This can be left permanently in a car and/or in your kit.

14. Pet information

m. Current photos

o These should show any distinguishing features and some should include you to make reclaiming your pet easier if they become lost

o Photos should also be kept in your wallet and given to people outside your immediate area

15. Bedding - towels and blankets

• Towels and blankets can be used in the carrier as bedding for the animal

• An extra supply can also be used as warmth and bedding for us
16. Toys, chew toys and treats (if space allows)

• Treats, familiar toys and items to chew can be very calming to animals in stressful situations

17. Cleaning supplies

• Plastic bags to pick up after your pet

• Litter scoops

• Paper towels

• Newspapers

• Dish soap (to clean bowls and litter boxes)

• Garbage bags

18. Emergency Contact Lists

• Prearrange emergency facilities outside your area that can accommodate you and/or your pets

o Have multiple possible locations to go to

�� ensure that they are in varying distances and directions from your house in case a large area is affected by the disaster

o Make list of hotels and motels that allow pets outside your immediate area

�� Also inquire with other hotels if they would allow pets in emergency situations

�� Include addresses and 24 hour phone numbers

o Speak with friends or family members outside your area about housing some or all of your pets and/or you in the event of an evacuation

�� Ensure that they know any medical or behavioural issues of your animals

o Contact animal shelters about their boarding policies during disaster scenarios

o Contact veterinary and boarding facilities outside your area to see if they will board your pet on short term notice

�� Include addresses and 24 hour phone numbers

• Make a list of emergency veterinary facilities outside your immediate area in case your animal needs emergency care

• Prepare multiple evacuation routes in case some roads are closed.

• Find out where lost animals are placed in the event of a disaster

o call local animal shelters for information

19. Map of local area including evacuation routes

• Prepare multiple evacuation routes in case some roads are closed.


Upon Warning of a Disaster

1. Bring all animals indoors so that you do not have to search for them

2. Check that all collars and identifications are securely fastened on the animal

3. Attach identification of the emergency shelter to the animals’ collars

4. Ensure disaster kit is fully equipped and ready for quick departure

5. Call evacuation location to ensure spaces are available for your pet and/or you

6. Place the larger animals’ solid sided transport carriers in your vehicle

7. Secure smaller animals in individual travel carriers

8. Attach leashes to larger animals when taking them outside and keep them near you

9. Load:

Disaster Kit
Smaller animals already in carriers
Place larger animals in carriers already in your vehicle

• When loading animals, try to keep prey species away from predator species

• If not possible to keep them separated, cover cages and place prey species higher up than predator species (ie: keep rats, rabbits, geckos, lizards, etc. covered and on a higher plain than dogs and cats)

*Ensure that the vehicle is temperature regulated

• If it is cold outside, turn heat on in car before loading animals

• If it is hot outside, turn air conditioning on in car before loading animals

• **Do not load animals into a hot car**


During a Disaster/Evacuation

If you are evacuating the area

1. Animals should be leashed at all times when not in your house or their carrier

Keep cats in carriers or on harnesses at all times as they can easily escape

2. Never leave your animal unattended unless they are in their carrier

3. During car travel:

Keep feeding to a minimum
Take frequent pit stops for bathroom breaks and exercise
Provide fresh water or ice cubes during pit stops

If you are staying in the disaster location

1. Find a safe area of your home where you will be able to avoid danger and where you and your pets can stay together

2. Keep cats in their carriers and dogs on leashes at all times while in your safe location

• If animals are not in your control it may be difficult to quickly gather them in the event you must evacuate the area

3. Bring your disaster kit into the safe area with you

4. Listen to the radio and do not come out of your safe area until officials deem the area secure

If you are not home

1. Keep in close contact with the person you designated to retrieve your pets

2. Meet at your predetermined meeting spot and take your pets to an emergency shelter


After returning from an Evacuation

1. Keep pets in carriers or on leashes

• Keep them contained until you have had a chance to locate damage

2. Survey your home

• Look for any damaged areas where your animals can get hurt or escape

Survey the area around your home

• Look for any debris or hazardous materials that may harm your pet

3. Initially, only release your pets indoors

• Other wildlife or pets may have been displaced during the disaster and could be dangerous

4. When pets are initially allowed outside, ensure that they are fenced in or leashed

• Their once familiar surrounds may have changed during the disaster and may now contain unfamiliar sights and smells that may cause your pet to become disoriented or lost.

If you lose your animal

1. Report your missing pet to the nearest animal shelter / animal control offices as soon as possible and find out where lost animals are housed in the area

2. Return to your neighbourhood when it is safe to look for your pet

3. Contact your nearest animal shelters and/or emergency hotlines

• Bring a picture of your pet with you to animal shelters

4. Post and hand out lost animal flyers which include your pets’ picture, name, your name and phone number

5. Contact neighbours, mail carriers, police, fire fighters and other service workers to look for your pet

If you find a lost animal

1. Do not allow the lost animal near your pets

2. Immediately contact your nearest animal shelter as well as emergency animal shelters

• If available, contact emergency lost pet hotlines

• be prepared to give a full description of the animal (breed, sex, colour, distinguishing features)

3. If possible, attempt to confine the animal without handling them and without risk to you or others

• Provide the animal with a bowl of water or food in a cage

• As soon as the animal enters the cage, close the door

• Wait for officials to pick up the animal or take the animal to the nearest animal shelter

• WARNING: Stressed, injured or sick animals can be unpredictable and should only be handled by experienced individuals


Supplement for Reptiles

1. Can be transported in small carriers or cloth sacks

• If using a cloth sack for transportation, ensure you have a secure carrier at the emergency facility to transfer them to

2. Reptiles can be marked with a permanent marker for identification (including other methods listed)

3. Also include in your Disaster kit:

1. Food Source

o Some reptiles have live food sources

�� ensure that you have an excess supply of food at all times

�� bring proper equipment to keep live food healthy and secure until your reptile requires feeding

o Some reptiles require fresh fruits and vegetables

�� Keep frozen or canned fruits and vegetables or baby jars of fruits and vegetables in supply for emergencies

�� Test your pet with the different types of food to ensure they will accept it prior to a disaster

o Some reptiles eat a pelleted diet

�� Enough food for at least 2 weeks
�� Store in an air-tight waterproof container
�� Replace every 2 months to avoid spoilage

2. Dietary supplements

3. Water bowl

o Ensure this is large enough for full body submersion

4. Heat source

o ie: heating pad, or other heat source that is battery operated, solar powered, or works off the car battery

5. Spray bottle

o If reptile needs to be moist or if they drink water droplets off of leaves or the sides of their tank

6. Towel or blanket

o To cover the animals’ carrier

4. At the emergency facility:

• Keep the carrier away from loud noises, bright lights or temperatures too extreme for the animal

• Covering the carrier with a towel or blanket will reduce stress for the animal

Supplement for Birds

1. Keep the bird in a small carrier, in which the bird cannot escape

2. Birds can have leg bands for identification (including other methods listed)

3. Also include in your Disaster kit:

1. Provide fresh food and water daily

2. Dietary supplements

3. Perch inside the carrier

4. Heating source - ie: hot water bottle, or other heat source in case of cold weather

5. Spray bottle - spray the birds feathers when it needs to be cooled in hot weather

6. Newspaper (or another material) - to line the bottom of the cage

7. Towel or blanket - to cover the animals’ carrier

4. During transportation

• give the bird a few slices of fresh fruit and vegetables that have a high water content as a source of water

5. At the emergency facility:

• Keep the carrier away from loud noises, bright lights or temperatures too extreme for the bird

• Covering the carrier with a towel or blanket will reduce stress for the bird

6. Do not let your bird out of the cage in unfamiliar surroundings

• They will readily fly away and may be difficult to capture

Supplement for other small animals (ie: hamsters, gerbils, ferrets, mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, etc.)

1. Keep the animal in a small carrier, in which it cannot escape

2. Also include in your Disaster kit:

1. Dietary supplements

2. Bedding materials

3. Exercise equipment

4. Towel or blanket - to cover the animals’ carrier

3. At the emergency facility:

• Keep the carrier away from loud noises, bright lights or temperatures too extreme for the animal

• Covering the carrier with a towel or blanket will reduce stress for the bird


 

 

 
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