OERS
Canadian Marine Mammal Rescue Network
 

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Education

OERS-F500 Success Now Well Established

The third year for the OERS-F500 Summer Field Course was a huge hit with students who were immersed in a “hands-on” experience in marine mammal anatomy. This field course, which is offered by the Oceanographic Environmental Research Society (OERS), took place during the second and third week of May 2009.

As the purpose of the course was to show students what a thorough dissection/autopsy consists of via a detailed, hands-on anatomical exploration of an intact Gray seal. Students conducted a supervised necropsy and dissection, learned how to diagnose the state of the animal’s health and its general condition while studying the wonders of pinniped adaptations to a marine environment.

All course materials were provided and space was limited to ensure the hands-on experience for all participants involved in this course. In addition, eligible students were also able to get a half credit course through the University of Toronto (code PSL 378H).

The popularity of this course is now well established and this year, despite mounting the course at the last minute due to availability of a case to study, the course was filled. Again, as with previous years, students felt that this was one of the best courses they had taken in their undergraduate training and that the course instructor, Dr. Carin Wittnich, was a great teacher and mentor.

Some commented that they were able to apply the knowledge they learned from previous animal physiology/anatomy courses and see it up close and personal.
Everyone commented that it was a once in a life time opportunity and are grateful that OERS made it possible for them to have this experience and the department of physiology for allowing it as a field course recognized credit.


Education

OERS-F500 A Success Once Again!!!

The second year for the OERS-F500 Summer Field Course was once again a hit with students who had a “hands-on” experience in marine mammal anatomy. This field course, which is offered by the Oceanographic Environmental Research Society (OERS), took place during the second and third week of May 2008.

As with the first year’s course, the purpose of the course was to teach students how to partake in a dissection/autopsy and it consisted of a detailed, hands-on anatomical exploration of a sea lion. Students were shown how to conduct a necropsy and dissection, how to diagnose the state of the animal’s health and its general condition while studying the wonders of pinniped adaptations to a marine environment.

All course materials were provided and space was limited to ensure the hands-on experience for all participants involved in this course. In addition, eligible students were also able to get a half credit course through the University of Toronto (code PSL 378H).

The popularity of this course continues to grow and this year we had to limit registration to ensure all students have as good an experience as ever! Again, as with last year, students felt that this was one of the best courses they had taken in their undergraduate training and that the course instructor, Dr. Carin Wittnich, was a great teacher and mentor.

Some commented that they were able to apply the knowledge they learned from previous animal physiology/anatomy courses and see it up close and personal.

They felt it was a once in a life time opportunity and are grateful that OERS gave them the privilege to learn about pinniped anatomy and their adaptations to a marine environment.
Education

OERS-F500 Makes a Big Splash With Students!!!

The first inaugural year for the OERS-F500 Summer Field Course was a hit with students who had a “hands-on” experience in marine mammal anatomy. This field course, which is offered by the Oceanographic Environmental Research Society (OERS), took place during the last week of July and first week of August 2007.

The purpose of the course was to teach students how to partake in a dissection/autopsy and it consisted of a detailed, hands-on anatomical exploration of a sea lion. Students were shown how to conduct a necropsy and dissection, how to diagnose the state of the animal’s health and its general condition while studying the wonders of pinniped adaptations to a marine environment.

All course materials were provided and space was limited to ensure the hands-on experience for all participants involved in this course. In addition, eligible students were also able to get a half credit course through the University of Toronto (code PSL 378H).

Overall, students felt that this was one of the best courses they had taken in their undergraduate training and that the course instructor, Dr. Carin Wittnich, was a great teacher and mentor.

Some commented that they were able to apply the knowledge they learned from previous animal physiology/anatomy courses and see it up close and personal.

They felt it was a once in a life time opportunity and are grateful that OERS gave them the privilege to learn about pinniped anatomy and their adaptations to a marine environment.


 

 

 
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